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A Stranger in a Strange Land: Never Rarely Sometimes Always

By Elias Savada. Now, more than ever, films that you’d expect to find in your Sadly Infrequently Occasionally Constantly attended art house cinemas aren’t there because of the Covid-19 crisis. Like most film distributors (at least in the United States), Focus Features has made Eliza Hittman’s wonderfully absorbing drama available at a slew of various […]

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A Unhailed Hero – Stirling Silliphant: The Fingers of God by Nat Segaloff

A Book Review Essay by Tony Williams. Thanks to one of my connections, I was able to see all of the episodes of the TV series Naked City (1957- 1963), 32 of the 39 episodes of the first season penned by legendary scenarist Stirling Silliphant (1918-1996). He was also Academy Award winner of In the Heat of the Night (1967), […]

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A Distinctive Vision – Second Sight: The Selected Film Writing of Adam Mars-Jones

By Jeremy Carr. There’s no denying Adam Mars-Jones has amassed a considerable resume of writing experience. The research professor at Goldsmiths, University of London has penned novels, essays, a memoir, and a number of articles on a range of topics, including film. But it’s this last area of concentration that is considered and collected in […]

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“They’re Gonna Put a Walmart Here”: PJ Harvey and A Dog Called Money

By John Duncan Talbird. I became aware of Polly Jean Harvey in 1993 when I first saw the video for her song “50 Ft Queenie” on MTV’s 120 Minutes. I was blown away. She was simultaneously petite and huge, dangerous and feminine, just like Juliette Lewis in Natural Born Killers which would come out the […]

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All Senses Considered – Contemporary Film Directors: Lucrecia Martel by Gerd Gemünden

A Book Review by Thomas Puhr. I received Gerd Gemünden’s Contemporary Film Directors: Lucrecia Martel without having seen a single film by the titular artist. To say I’ve been missing out is an understatement. The movies themselves are evidence enough of Martel’s singular vision and its significance to global cinema, but having the additional opportunity […]

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Light and Silly: Love Type D

By Elias Savada. Love Type D is a light, silly satire that could use a little more development in its wacky plotline. Still, the feature debut from writer-director Sasha Collington does have its moments until it rushes to solve one big scientific riddle with a bit of madcap ho hum in its finish. This British […]

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Folks, Please Lock Your Doors!: The Dark End of the Street

By Elias Savada. World premiering at the DC Independent Film Festival, director-writer Kevin Tran’s feature debut brews up a disconcerting cross-sampling of concerned residents in a middle-class, suburban New York City neighborhood. They want to think they are in Mayberry (where no one locks their doors), but one wonders why they don’t in today’s world. […]

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(Re)considering Rudolph Valentino

By Thomas Gladysz. We are going to see why Rudolph Valentino got his first star billing, in a picture called Blood and Sand…. In 1922, when that picture was released, it was considered the absolute epitome of adult entertainment. Well, it is still a good show. Before this picture, his type was unknown on the […]

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Trans Lives Matter: The Garden Left Behind

By Elias Savada. Director Flavio Alves’s indie feature The Garden Left Behind is all about dreamers, whether they are transgender people looking for acceptance, or illegal immigrants hoping that armed authorities are more than an arm’s distance away. Alves seriously explores the trials and tribulations of a young Mexican trans woman’s hopes and aspirations in […]

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The Magnificent Stranger: Pasolini’s Teorema and its Tradition (Criterion Collection)

By Christopher Sharrett. Many years ago I moved into a small house not far from the university where I took my first tenure-track position. It was a cozy little place on a pleasant street where ancient trees formed a protective, shady bower. It was a lower-middle-class neighborhood that seemed friendly. People at first waved to […]

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