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A Big Crumble: The Great Wall

By Elias Savada. So, let’s get to the big question you’re asking your mirror. Is Matt Damon’s new fantasy action movie the greatest wall of them all? Well, for big screen entertainment, including those of you who like this sort of FX-driven, over-stylized, popcorn munching diversion, The Great Wall is indeed a big budget ($150 […]

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Condition: Cloudy – A Patch of Fog

By Elias Savada. Irish director Michael Lennox has been to the Oscars – for his 2014 film Boogaloo and Graham, a heartwarming comedy short. It lost, but at least people (well, Academy voters) saw it. Now, Lennox has gone over to the dark side with his feature debut, A Patch of Fog, a low-budget noir entry […]

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The Passion of James Baldwin: I Am Not Your Negro

By John Duncan Talbird. On the police brutality episode of ABC’s sitcom Black-ish, the teenaged son, Junior (Marcus Scribner), reads out loud from Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me (2015). His father, Dre (Anthony Anderson), derisively responds, “Malcolm X said the same thing fifty years ago.” Dre’s father (Laurence Fishburne) says, “And James Baldwin said […]

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Family and Transition: This is Everything – Gigi Gorgeous

By Kate Hearst. Over the course of forty-plus years, Barbara Kopple has made her documentaries with one focus: to be truthful to the voices of her subjects, whether they are coal miners or country singers. In her new film, This is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous, Kopple crafts a heart-gripping narrative capturing the journey of transgender YouTube star, […]

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The Heart of Fuller’s Marauders: Film is Like a Battleground – Samuel Fuller’s War Movies by Marsha Gordon

A Book Review by Tony Williams. During his lifetime, Samuel Fuller was fortunate enough to receive acclaim from monographs and articles dedicated to his films as well as continue working for as long as possible in film, unlike Buster Keaton and Douglas Sirk. Regardless of championship by Cahiers du Cinema, the Edinburgh 1969 Film Festival and […]

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A Conquering Female Spirit in The Brand New Testament

By Kate Hearst. First screened at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015, and recently released in the United States, Belgian director Jaco Van Dormael’s surrealistic fantasy, The Brand New Testament, chronicles a familial struggle between a mean-spirited patriarchal God (Benoît Poelvoorde) and his feisty ten-year old-daughter Ea (Pili Groyne) with humanity in the balance. Given the […]

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Out of the Past: Jack Garfein’s Something Wild on Criterion

By Tony Williams. Something Wild (1961) has nothing to do with the similarly titled well-known 1986 Jonathan Demme film. In fact before the list of Criterion new releases arrived, I frankly confess that I had never even heard of it. How can anyone now claim to have an encyclopedia knowledge of cinema that may have […]

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Lars-Martin Sorenson’s Censorship of Japanese Films during the U.S. Occupation of Japan: The Cases of Yasujiro Ozu and Akira Kurosawa

A Book Review by Matthew Fullerton.  Lars-Martin Sorenson is probably best known to cinephiles for his interview on censorship during the American occupation of Japan, which accompanies Criterion’s 2007 release of Drunken Angel (1948). At the time, he had just completed his PhD, and Censorship of Japanese Films during the U.S. Occupation of Japan: The […]

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The Cacophony of History: Cinéma Militant by Paul Douglas Grant

A Book Review by John Duncan Talbird. Paul Douglas Grant’s new book Cinéma Militant: Political Filmmaking & May 1968 (Wallflower Press, 2016) is a history of leftist French film – mostly Marxist-Leninist or Maoist – arising out of the student-worker protests of May ’68 and stretching to the late seventies when many of the film collectives […]

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Hello, Daleks – Good to Have You Back: Dr. Who The Power of the Daleks Animated Restoration on DVD

By Tony Williams. 50 years ago I watched the one and only BBC TV transmission of The Power of the Daleks (November to December, 1966) one of the now missing serials of the early Dr. Who series (premiering in 1963). The opening episode introduced Patrick Troughton (1920-1987) as the replacement for the much beloved William Hartnell […]

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