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Dying To Live Another Day: Realive

By Elias Savada. The general belief that there is seemingly civil attitude toward one another in our planet’s clean, sterile looking future reflects the sci-fi genre’s long-standing notion that there is no clutter in our lives down the road. As seen in Realive, an existential look into life after death from Spanish-born director-writer Mateo Gil, […]

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Early Black Cinema Recovered: Lost Boundaries (1949)

By Louis J. Wasser. In the late 1940s, a man from New Hampshire named Albert Johnston, Jr. wrote a letter to film documentarian Louis de Rochemont. Johnston, in his early 20s, alluded to the book Lost Boundaries written by William L. White about his father, the elder Albert Johnston, a physician. He suggested his father’s […]

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Enjoyable Traces: After The Fox (1966) from Kino Lorber

By Tony Williams. Back in 1965 BBC TV screened a documentary introduced by Dirk Bogarde, The Epic that Never Was, an informative analysis of a 1937 failed film version of I, Claudius that would have been directed by Josef von Sternberg starring Charles Laughton in a role that would later be performed by Freddie Jones and […]

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A Lumbering Beast: Woodshock, Woodshlock

By Elias Savada. The answer to whether smoking kills lies beneath the surface of this abstract but ultimately empty-plotted first feature from sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy, better known for having created the designer label Rodarte. The film, apparently inspired by the scenic American backdrop that infuses their fashion line, suffers through a fragile journey embedded […]

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Life After Death: Dementia 13 (2017)

By Jeremy Carr. Francis Ford Coppola’s low-budget, low-key 1963 shocker, Dementia 13, was the first substantial step in the legendary filmmaker’s career. Like other Roger Corman produced features, it was shot on the cheap and in short order, and in most respects, it shows. Sufficiently atmospheric, with ample twists and enough stylistic filler to maintain mild […]

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Dystopia Awaits: Blade Runner 2049

By Elias Savada. When I last visited Denis Villeneuve it was when I reviewed one of the best films of last year. Arrival was that perfect storm of a film from a masterful storyteller and technician…but I’ve since changed my mind about it. It is actually the best film of 2016, one that still demands […]

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Harry Dean Stanton: Finally, Sadly, Career-Topping in Lucky

By Elias Savada. Harry Dean Stanton was older than dirt when he died earlier this month. In human years, that was 91. I’m pretty sure if you placed him side by side with a mound of desert fill, they’d look the same. With an acting career that spanned 60 years and more than 200 films, […]

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An Actor’s Life – Which One was David? by David Frankham with Jim Hollifield

A Book Review by Tony Williams. The title of this review is not accidental. It is deliberately meant to evoke the title of that 1978 book by Charlton Heston, The Actor’s Life: Journals 1956-1976, but with the definite article changed to emphasize the fact that many actors, not all of them major stars, also have […]

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New York Plays Itself: Brian Tochterman’s The Dying City

A Book Review by John Duncan Talbird. In Thom Anderson’s documentary, Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003), the history and culture of L.A. is narrated over film clips from other movies. For nearly three hours, this captivating documentary shows how Los Angeles, when it hasn’t “played itself” in the history of movies, has stood in for […]

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Life on Hold: Mike Leigh’s Meantime (Criterion Collection)

By Jeremy Carr. Based solely on his latest string of features – Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), Another Year (2010), Mr. Turner (2014) – one might reasonably assume all Mike Leigh films are mostly comical snippets of cockney quirkiness and bubbly English pleasantry. It doesn’t take much to see this hasn’t always been the case, however. Far from it. […]

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