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Cops, Criminals, and Cultural Revolution: The Nile Hilton Incident

By Jeremy Carr. There are bound to be comparisons made between Tarik Saleh’s The Nile Hilton Incident and several films of the past. Understandably so. This 2017 thriller, a multinational coproduction, has the embittered cynicism of Roman Polanski’s Chinatown (1974) and the seedy city view of Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver (1976), all encased in the procedural, […]

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Daughter of the South, Star Across Borders – Ava: A Life in Movies by Kendra Bean and Anthony Uzarowski

A Book Review by Louis J. Wasser. I once confessed to a friend that, despite my preoccupation with serious film, I remained guilty of sporting an unabashed crush on Ava Gardner. While I’d never deluded myself that she possessed the superb talents of, say, French actor Simone Signoret or American method actor Geraldine Page, Ava’s […]

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The Last Hurrah of John Garfield: Criterion’s The Breaking Point (1950)

By Tony Williams. Since the inclusion of a co-written article by Tom Flinn and John Davis in the pre-David Bordwell University of Wisconsin-Madison era of The Velvet Light Trap (in an issue titled “Forbidden, Forgotten, Neglected and Unlucky Films”), Michael Curtiz’s The Breaking Point (1950) has been relatively neglected until fairly recently. (1) In 1975, […]

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Gilda Lost and Gilda Regained: Concerning The Lady Eve’s Destructive Relationship with Two Sexually Confused Adams

By James Churchill. Nobody forgets the first time they experienced Hayworth’s sudden emergence from the bottom of the frame in Gilda. The quick snap of the head that sends her hair in orbit, the calculated smirk, and the snarky, one-word response that lets us know right away who she cares most about… “Me?” The speed of […]

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A Workman Finding His Artistry: The Cinematography of Roger Corman by Pawel Aleksandrowicz

A Book Review by Brad Cook. For many film fans, myself included, the name Roger Corman typically evokes an immediate response: That guy who makes schlocky movies quickly and cheaply and throws them out there to make a few bucks. Anyone who’s also a fan of the show Mystery Science Theater 3000 is familiar with many […]

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Siri Grows Up: Marjorie Prime

By Elias Savada. In a lovely, earth-toned Long Island beach house, Walter Lancaster (Jon Hamm) comes and goes in rather disconcerting fashion. He doesn’t use the door or walk in from another room. He’s just…there. He doesn’t eat much, either. In fact, nothing at all. Then again, he’s just a hologram that pops in and […]

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The Cinematic Culture of Conspicuous Consumption – When Knighthood was in Flower (1922)

By Tony Williams. Like Alejandro Jodorowsky’s recently released Endless Poetry (2016) and Samantha Fuller’s tribute to her late father A Fuller Life (2013), the DVD restoration of one of Marion Davies’s most notable films is indebted to those legion of people who have contributed via Kickstarter. Unlike Jodorowsky’s Twitter-funded film, the final credits of When […]

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I Did…You Shouldn’t: I Do…Until I Don’t

By Elias Savada. There are problems a-plenty in Vero Beach, Florida, and after watching them dribble forth in the lame ensemble comedy I Do…Until I Don’t, I feel that this piece of sunshiny beach would be the last place on earth I’d want to live. While Florida does have a high divorce rate, the city […]

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The Trip to Spain: A Road Best Not Taken

By Elias Savada. Always light-hearted and entertaining, the deadpan road films featuring the improvisation talents of Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon have christened their third voyage, The Trip to Spain, after the duo had previously traipsed through Northern England and Italy. This casual excursion, like previous ones, offers up a multitude of actor impressions sprinkled among […]

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On “Symbolic Annihilation”: Killing Off the Lesbians by Liz Millward, Janice G. Dodd, and Irene Fubara-Manuel

A Book Review by Gary M. Kramer. Killing Off the Lesbians by Liz Millward, Janice G. Dodd and Irene Fubara-Manuel (McFarland, 2017) addresses the unfortunate trope in film and television in which women who love women are killed off (or in some cases sacrifice themselves for their lovers). The authors, all academics, argue collaboratively that seeing lesbian […]

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