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A Formidable Pairing: Green Book

By Elias Savada. The exceptionally crisp performances by Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen are but two of the great things about Green Book, a very solid contender for Best Picture accolades, and much more. This heartwarming, soul searching inspired-by-a-true-story features well-educated virtuoso pianist Don Shirley (Ali) and his Italian-American chauffeur-protector-confidant Tony Villelonga (Mortensen) as they road trip […]

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Pork Pie Hats Off to The Great Buster: A Celebration

By Elias Savada. The breakneck parade of Hollywood celebrities seems endless in Peter Bogdonavich’s love letter to silent film comedian Buster Keaton. It feels like Friends, Romans, and Countrymen are marching before the camera to recount the influences galore that the great actor and filmmaker has had on their lives. Keaton, star of such silent […]

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Screwball/Great Depression Denial Syndrome: My Man Godfrey (Criterion Collection)

By Tony Williams. Gregory La Cava’s My Man Godfrey (1936) is admittedly one of the best screwball comedies of the 1930s that provided witty dialogue, entertainment, and “acceptable” references to the Great Depression in the limited manner Hollywood allowed at this time. Far removed from the more gritty Warner Bros’ type of productions such as […]

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Lensing a Colonial Past – Parameters of Disavowal: Colonial Representation in South Korean Cinema by Jinsoo An

A Book Review by Madeline Hawk. Using prolific Korean New Wave director Im Kwon-Taek to introduce Korean cinema’s preoccupation with its colonial past, Jinsoo An’s Parameters of Disavowal: Colonial Representations in South Korean Cinema (University of California Press, 2018) engages a close reading of an early scene in The Genealogy (1978), where a now demolished Japanese […]

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Homages, Attack!: Killer Kate!

By Janine Gericke. I really wanted to like Killer Kate! It’s clear that director Elliot Feld loves horror movies and has grown up watching the classics. But, the film is so full of homages and references that it fails to create anything new. Kate (Alexandra Feld) and her younger sister Angie (Danielle Burgess) haven’t seen […]

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Animal Kingdom: Cornel Wilde’s The Naked Prey (Criterion Collection)

By Jeremy Carr. The opening narration of The Naked Prey (1965) sets the scene in the African wilderness and the nature of humanity in this volatile land, where white men besiege the region in search of tusks and slaves. It is a cruel and bloody backstory, humanity as vicious and portending a bestial way of life. Like […]

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Where’s Daddy?: Megan Griffiths’ Sadie

By Janine Gericke. Director Megan Griffiths has made a captivating film about how one parent’s absence can have immense complications on the family. While her military father is serving multiple tours overseas, Sadie (a bold performance by Sophia Mitri Schloss) takes it upon herself to make sure he still has a place at home whenever […]

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A Great Profile Piece – Murray Pomerance and Steven Rybin’s Hamlet Lives in Hollywood: John Barrymore and the Acting Tradition Onscreen

A Book Review by Brandon Konecny. For many today, the name John Barrymore means little – except, perhaps, that it shares the same surname with Drew Barrymore (yes, there’s a relation). But in his day, John Barrymore’s work elicited the admiration of many beholders, including Orson Welles. In fact, Welles once declared that John Barrymore […]

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Colette in the #MeToo Era

By Elizabeth Toohey. If ever a movie was ripe for release, it’s the new bio-pic Colette. The life and career of one of France’s most celebrated novelists hits in rapid succession all the major notes of the MeToo movement, which shows no signs of slowing down, now with the recent Supreme Court appointment of Brett […]

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Charm in Spades: Tea with Dames

By Gary M. Kramer. The gentle, charming documentary, Tea with the Dames eavesdrops on the gossip, memories, and laughs shared by four grand British actresses: Joan Plowright, Maggie Smith, Judi Dench, and Eileen Atkins. Director Roger Michell films these longtime friends together, or in pairs, at Plowright’s “cottage,” asking questions about their work and their […]

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