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Max Winkler’s Flower Sour

By Elias Savada. I didn’t like Max Winkler’s first feature, the dreary comedy Ceremony (2011), a quirky tic of a wedding crasher film. My impression of his directorial abilities hasn’t changed much in Flower, a jaded Valley Girl vigilante drama that screams “watch my petals wilt” as shell-shocked patrons wander out of art houses trying […]

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Andy Goldsworthy’s Landscape Art: Leaning Into the Wind

By John Duncan Talbird. In the opening of the new documentary, Leaning Into the Wind, artist Andy Goldsworthy tours a small home in the mountains in Brazil. To Western eyes, the dwelling might seem pre-modern, even decrepit. But to Goldsworthy, all he sees is the handcraft of the residence, the sturdy joists in the ceiling, and […]

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Role-Playing Writ Small: I Kill Giants

By Elias Savada. Children dealing with their fears – although not those anxieties normally associated with horror genre tropes like The Dark, Loud Noises, and such – play a central role in I Kill Giants, which melds one Eastern Long Island, New York, family’s enigmatic trauma with monstrous, noxious beasts that inhabit the mind of a […]

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Comedy Killing Satire: The Death of Stalin

By Jake Rutkowski. The process of interpersonal grievances and small-scale ironies rippling out into matters of national security is at this point a calling card for celebrated Scottish satirist Armando Iannucci (he of Alan Partridge, The Thick of It / In the Loop, and Veep fame). It’s fair to say that The Death of Stalin, his […]

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A Misguided Adventure: A Wrinkle in Time

By Elias Savada. If I were a 12-year-old girl (particularly one of color), I probably would be anxiously awaiting, with all my BFFs, the arrival of A Wrinkle in Time, the transformative adaptation (as opposed to the dismal 2003 television version, also brought to you by Disney) of the beloved, best-selling children’s book by Madeleine L’Engle. […]

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“Too Beautiful for Brilliance” – Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story

By Anthony Uzarowski. Hedy Lamarr was a movie star for whom the term glamour might have been invented. As far as celluloid goddesses go, she was the crème de la crème, perhaps the most beautiful face to ever have graced the silver screen. During the Second World War, Lamarr offered legions of fatigued servicemen a cinematic vision […]

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More Mood Than Mayhem: They Remain

By Elias Savada. In case you’re not feeling enough dread after watching Natalie Portman push her way through The Shimmer in the unsettling Annihilation, there are similar aural, low-frequency bass rumblings that might send your mind and body into similar fits in the smaller but nearly as disquieting They Remain. This horror-lite tale harkens up […]

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More Complications: Films of the New French Extremity by Alexandra West

A Book Review by Alex Brannan. When James Quandt coined the term “New French Extremity” in a piece for ArtForum, he referred to such a naming as something a “critic truffle-snuffing for trends” might do (“Flesh and blood”). Perhaps to his own chagrin, he was snuffing in exactly the right place to spot the trend. […]

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Pedestrian Action: 7 Guardians of the Tomb

By Elias Savada. The Mummy was a huge, expensive flop last year, and relics of the archaeology digs genre are still up and about (Lara Croft is due back shortly). But if you have a craving for some lame action adventure down under from Down Under, 7 Guardians of the Tomb is ready for your viewing. […]

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Coincidence and Conviction: Irving Pichel’s Tomorrow is Forever (1946)

By Jeremy Carr. It takes a sustained suspension of disbelief to accept what is tendered by Tomorrow is Forever. To permit the premise of this 1946 romantic drama, it is imperative for one to pardon its convoluted plotline and its unyielding dedication to coincidence. And fortunately, such is the quality of the film’s production, from its […]

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