Home » September 29th, 2011 Entries posted on “September, 2011”

The Secret World of Arrietty

By Anna Arnman. Arrietty is Studio Ghibli’s latest film, based on Mary Norton’s novel The Borrowers from 1952. Arrietty belongs to the four-inch tall Clock family who lives anonymously in another, ‘big’, family’s residence and their home is a collection of things they have borrowed from the big world. Arrietty is directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi […]

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Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)

By Jamie Isbell. In 2008 Tomas Alfredson lit up the vampire genre. His collaboration with author John Ajvide Lindqvist on Let The Right One In broke away the formulaic mist surrounding the vampire flicks that had occupied decades of cinema, and replaced it with a terrifying breath of reality. It typified the 1980s in a […]

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A Documentary History of Swedish Metal

By Anna Arnman. Så jävla metal (which translates as ‘So damned metal’) is a Swedish documentary about the nation’s heavy metal scene, from the early 1970s until now. It is based on hundreds of interviews with bands and performers like November, Neon Rose, Europe, Yngwie Malmsteen, Arch Enemy and In Flames. Sweden is one of […]

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The Eye of the Storm (2011)

By Carolyn Lake. Fred Schepisi’s latest film, The Eye of the Storm, opened this month in select theatres around Australia and enjoyed a warm reception for its international debut at the Toronto International Film Festival. The film is an adaptation of the 1973 novel by Nobel prizing-winning Australian author, Patrick White. Adapted for the screen […]

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Attack the Block (2011)

By Janine Gericke. “This is too much madness to explain in one text,” one of five hoodlums turned heroes screams in Joe Cornish’s already-cult sci-fi film Attack the Block. The film won raves at South by Southwest, winning the Audience award, and was quickly picked up by Screen Gems for U.S. theatrical release. It certainly didn’t […]

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Drive (2011)

By Bryan Nixon. “What do you do?” Irene asked. He carefully calculated his response and replied, “I drive.” The protagonist of Drive is a passive aggressive unnamed entity who consistently acts with precision in any given situation. He rarely speaks, and when he does it is usually when he has first been spoken to. Staring […]

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Beginners (2010)

By Janine Gericke. I have to say that I adore this film. Beginners is Mike Mills’s second feature film, following 2005’s Thumbsucker, which intrigued me through its vulnerable perspective. In Beginners, Mills creates a delicate story based on his own experiences. It’s packed with a spread of incredibly sweet and absolutely heartbreaking moments. At the age of 75, Hal […]

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Apollo 18 (2011)

By Steven Harrison Gibbs. The poster for this latest cash grab in the ever-lucrative wave of ‘found footage’ horror cinema intrigued me when I saw it in passing at a local theater earlier this year, its tagline stating ‘There’s a reason we’ve never gone back to the moon,’ and underneath these words two footprints – […]

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Saving London’s Cinema Museum: French Sundaes

By Deirdre O’Neill. For the next six months as part of its ongoing fundraising effort The Cinema Museum is hosting a season of French films that will, hopefully, provide a snapshot of French cinema over the last 80 years. The programme has been curated by Jon Davies and will screen work from the Lumiere brothers […]

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‘In the Field’

‘In the Field’ is our virtual take on a talent campus — programs that many film festivals these days are implementing — with the aim of supporting young scholars and emerging writers. So please join us in welcoming our new authors, and in our efforts to champion these budding artists by reading their posts and […]

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