Home » July 31st, 2014 Entries posted on “July, 2014”

The Films of Joanna Hogg

By Gary M. Kramer. With the release of Joanna Hogg’s three features, Unrelated (2007), Archipelago (2010), and Exhibition (2013), it is imperative for cinephiles to discover her brilliance as a filmmaker. Hogg’s films are remarkable for their perspicacity. The filmmaker captures the intimacies between family members and their environments in an unflinching manner. In a […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

AFI Docs Film Festival 2014

By Michael Miller.  AFI Docs, now in its second year, unspooled June 18-22 at multiple venues in the District of Columbia and all three screens at the AFI Silver Theater in Silver Spring, Maryland. Eager fans of non-fiction film queued up for mostly sold out screenings of some of the best documentary offerings of the […]

Posted in Festival Reports | Read More »

What’s at Stake in the Work of Art: John Cassavetes’ The Killing of a Chinese Bookie

By Brandon Konecny. Apart from Faces (1968) and A Woman Under the Influence (1974), none of Cassavetes’ films were successful, both commercially and critically. They were seen as chaotic, technically inept, haphazardly improvised—they were, in short, a chore to watch. But none of them, not even Husbands (1970), incurred the critical wrath that The Killing […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

The Virus Returns: An Interview with Kaare Andrews

By Paul Risker. Just as a virus needs a host, there is a broad collection of films placed both within and outside of the horror genre that employ viral infection. These films tap into our innate fears of one another, and the obsessive compulsive disorders of the fear of human contact. Sequel and franchise are […]

Posted in Interview | Read More »

The Time of His Life: Richard Linklater’s Boyhood

By Matthew Sorrento. I honestly hope the “sublime” trend ends soon, with the recent output of Terrence Malick, his bombastic, excessive Tree of Life and To the Wonder, and gaseous muck like Cloud Atlas, cramming together years of history and a speculative look to the future, to signify nothing. Thankfully, Richard Linklater saw past the […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

The Art House Convergence Regional Seminar 2014

By Mark James.  It’s fitting that “Art House Convergence” spells it with two separate words. Without the specificity that the term “Arthouse” commands in the film world, “Art House” can enjoy a far wider interpretation. The Art House Convergence, which started as an adjunct to the Sundance Film Festival in 2008, holds it’s annual meeting […]

Posted in Festival Reports | Read More »

Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975)

By Jeremy Carr.  Even if we weren’t told at the start that Picnic at Hanging Rock was about a group of girls who disappeared Saturday, Feb. 14, 1900 and were never seen again, it would become apparent almost immediately that this 1975 film was not going to end happily, or progress normally. Director Peter Weir, […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

Hide Your Smiling Faces (2013)

By Jude Warne. In his 1854 book Walden, Henry David Thoreau sets forth a crucial instruction: “Resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” This, perhaps, is the overarching message of Daniel Patrick Carbone’s first feature film Hide Your Smiling Faces. In the proverbial end (or, for the sake of this film’s characters, by the […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

The Corman Legacy Continues: An Interview with Evelyn Maude Purcell

By Anna Weinstein. Heatstroke, starring Stephen Dorff, Svetlana Metkina, and Maisie Williams (Game of Thrones), tells the story of a female search and rescue worker put to the ultimate test of survival when her boyfriend is murdered in the African desert and she’s tasked with evading his killers while protecting his willful teenage daughter. The […]

Posted in Interview | Read More »

Gaming the Future: An Interview with Jeremy Snead on Video Games: The Movie

By Paul Risker. Every art form has a story, and recalling Mark Cousins’ description of film being a grass roots art form raises the question what term would be most fitting to describe video games, the youngest of the art forms. Despite their youthful age, the story of video games is an endlessly fascinating story […]

Posted in Interview | Read More »