Home » September 11th, 2014 Entries posted on “September, 2014”

A Personal First Feature: Hong Khaou on Lilting

By Tom Ue. Hong Khaou spent seven years at an independent film distribution company, managing their Home Entertainment department and was also part of their acquisition team. He has written and directed two short films: “Summer” and “Spring.” “Summer” (2006) premiered at the Berlinale Film Festival, and “Spring” (2011) at the Sundance Film Festival. It was […]

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A Thriller in Brief: on Point Mugu

By Paul Risker. Inevitably there must be a point of origin, and whilst it would be an exaggeration to term the short film Point Mugu (2013) as such, it is a film of firsts for three individuals who have expanded and explored their creative horizons. Actress Amelia Jackson-Gray couples her writing and producing duties with a […]

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Starred Up (2014)

By Sam Littman.  Within the first fifteen minutes of David Mackenzie’s prison drama Starred Up, it becomes clear that the titular felon, 19-year old Eric Love (Jack O’Connell), belongs in prison, though in this case the offense that sent him to a Young Offender Institution and the misbehavior that caused him to be ‘starred up’ […]

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Santo in the Museum of the Mexican Film Industry

By John Burns. It seems that a number of historians and critics of Mexican film would be happier if the films starring lucha libre wrestler Santo had never been produced. One British university’s website on Mexican cinema called the Santo films “invariably stupid.” In Carl J. Mora’s exhaustive study of Mexican cinema, he labels Santo’s […]

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Truth in Character: An Interview with Virginia Madsen

By Paul Risker. What is in a number? Well in answer to a self-posed question, something of significance, as Virginia Madsen has or will have donned by the conclusion of next year a collection of guises that reaches into triple figures. So who is Virginia Madsen? There is Virginia Madsen the woman, and then there […]

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The Boxtrolls (2014)

By Cleaver Patterson.  American-made animated films appear to have a fascination with middle European cities and architecture. Take The Boxtrolls for instance: the latest work from Laika Entertainment—the production company behind recent hits Coraline (2009) and Paranorman (2012)—has a predominance of gabled rooftops and twisting cobbled streets, which not only lends the tale a tone of otherworldliness, […]

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La Sirga (2013)

By James Teitelbaum. The armed conflict in Columbia has now been claiming lives for fifty years. The Columbian government has been battling several paramilitary organizations plus a handful of further guerrilla groups over everything from land reform to cocaine production. With those same guerrilla groups allegedly working for mafia drug lords, they don’t always have […]

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A World of Constant Peril: Seriality, Narrative, and Closure

By Wheeler Winston Dixon. What are we watching now at the movies, or on television or Netflix for that matter?[1] Serials – though now they’re called franchises, or mini-series, or “cable dramas,” but they have the same structure, and the same limitations, the same narrative predictability. What will happen, for example, in the next episode […]

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Nixon – Oliver Stone’s Rough Beast Slouching

By Tony Williams. Like most of his films, Oliver Stone’s Nixon (1995) generated considerable critical debate usually emphasizing questions of historical accuracy and biographical depiction. However, unlike JFK (1991) and Natural Born Killers (1994), it received poor box office returns. Nixon not only represented Stone’s decision to change his usual style towards restraint rather than […]

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