Home » December 16th, 2015 Entries posted on “December, 2015”

An Antidote for Loneliness: Dreams Rewired

By Jude Warne. “What is the good of all this progress? By overcoming distance we overcome difference.” True – it seems likely that the only route to world peace is the route that points straight ahead – or if not straight, then at least ahead. Because it is most definitely not back there in the past, […]

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From Shakespeare to Superheroes: An Interview with Jordan Galland

By Tom Ue. Jordan Galland has directed commercials, music videos and three feature films: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Undead (2010), Alter Egos (2012), and Ava’s Possessions (2016). As a recording artist, he has released over a dozen albums of his own songs since 1998 and contributed music to films and TV shows as well an […]

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Spike Gets His Groove Back: Chi-Raq

By Elias Savada. I was ready to give up on Spike Lee after suffering through Red Hook Summer, his 2012 scattershot meditation on the director’s beloved Brooklyn. Lo and behold, the joint man is back in fine iambic pentameter form with the latest adaptation of the ancient Greek dramedy Lysistrata by Aristophanes. I’ve got to admit, […]

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Simple, Beautiful Perfection in Brooklyn

By Elias Savada. It’s interesting that novelist-screenwriter-producer Nick Hornby and director John Crowley previously have been best known in the world of cinema for their boyish works. Hornby wrote the charming novel About a Boy (1998), which became an award-winning comedy film in 2002 that introduced us to rising star Nicholas Hoult. Five years later […]

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A Master and a Masterpiece: Hitchcock/Truffaut

By Robert K. Lightning. The historic 1962 interview of Alfred Hitchcock by Francois Truffaut (ironically tape recorded and photographed, but apparently unfilmed) that led to the publication of Truffaut’s landmark Hitchcock in 1966, is examined in Kent Jones’s fine new documentary Hitchcock/Truffaut. That the interview was a singular moment in the history of cinema and […]

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“A Process of Thinking”: Radu Jude on Aferim!

By Paul Risker. Ask the Romanian filmmaker Radu Jude how he views the place of his most recent feature AFERIM! within his body of work, and his response will be a modest one. “Well you know, when you say this important expression ‘body of work’, it makes me feel somehow like an imposter because I have […]

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“Cause You’d Rather Live for the Thrill of it All” – A Wealthy Woman with a Hell of an Art Collection: Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict (2015)

By Jude Warne. “Her voice is full of money,” Jay Gatsby says of his love Daisy Buchanan in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 masterwork. There is something in the aural quality of socialite speak that suggests the speaker holds a vague indifference toward whatever matter may be at hand, because its outcome will have very little […]

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A Comeback and a New Beginning: Jackie Earle Haley on Criminal Activities

By Matthew Sorrento. Like many child actors, Jackie Earle Haley faded from the spotlight as he reached maturity. He was relaxed on camera, which helped him exude cool as a lost youth finding a talent in The Bad News Bears (1976) and a teen making steps to adulthood in Breaking Away (1979). Curtis Hanson’s Losin’ It (1983) offered Haley the lead, and the unfavorable response made the […]

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Larry Cohen: The Stuff of Gods and Monsters (2015)

A Book Review by Tony Williams. Those fortunate enough to have met or interviewed Larry Cohen are always amazed by his detailed answers to questions as well as his unique knowledge of American cinema and history. Michael Doyle’s Bear Manor Press publication is the most detailed compilation of interview material that has so far appeared. […]

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Room: Woman and the Domestic Household

By Christopher Sharrett. Lenny Abrahamson’s Room, adapted from a recent novel by Emma Donoghue, is a “true crime” thriller of important resonance. Its story concerns a now-common and atrocious crime: a woman is kidnapped by a rapist and kept prisoner, a permanent sex slave. Joy Newsome (Brie Larson) is locked in a part of a […]

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