Home » October 31st, 2016 Entries posted on “October, 2016”

Gregory Crewdson: Chronicle of Decay

By Christopher Sharrett. I write this short piece on photographer Gregory Crewdson for a film/television journal with the simple rationale that Crewdson’s photographs, as has by now been acknowledged, have the aspect of one-image movies. Their lighting and composition recall the look of some of the fantastic cinema. Indeed, Crewdson resembles a film director in […]

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Exit Stage Left: No Pay, Nudity

By Elias Savada. The directorial debut for Lee Wilkof – a long-time character actor in all forms of media and on many a stage – No Pay, Nudity is one for the art house crowd. Yet, even “art house” folks may have issues with the bland story line (by actor-turned-feature-debut screenwriter Ethan Sandler) and the light-handed direction […]

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A Formidable Presence Onscreen: A Conversation with Salma Monani on Ecocinema

By Rayson K. Alex and S. Susan Deborah. Salma Monani is Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at Gettysburg College, Pennsylvania, United States of America, and currently a Carson Fellow at Rachel Carson Centre for Environment and Society in Munich, Germany. As an environmental humanities scholar, Monani’s primary research in ecocinema studies is informed by literary ecocriticism, history, communication […]

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Miss Sharon Jones!: Success and Other Crises

By Kate Hearst. Renewed interest in black female singers sparked the release last year of two documentaries focused on voices of the Civil Rights movement: What Happened, Miss Simone? about the late soul singer and activist Nina Simone, and Mavis! featuring gospel singer Mavis Staples and the Staple Singers. In contrast, Barbara Kopple’s Miss Sharon […]

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“A Big Job”: A Conversation About The Battle of Algiers with Saadi Yacef

By John Duncan Talbird. The Battle of Algiers (1966) is one of the essential postcolonial texts of the 20th century. It complicates many of the assumptions that too often get taken for granted even now, fifty years later: the essentialism of race, the terrorist/freedom fighter binary, the ethics and efficacy of torture to name just a few. […]

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The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger (2016)

By Mark James.  Most of us probably remember John Berger as the host of Ways of Seeing, a four-part 1972 television series that he created for BBC where Berger educated the nation about looking at art, effectively demonstrating that one can discuss the so called ‘Old Masters’ in ways that are both eloquent and understandable. […]

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In the Season of the Witch: Victor Matellano on Vampyres

By Sotiris Petridis. Set in an English manor inhabited by two lesbian vampires and a man imprisoned in the basement, Vampyres enlivens the familiar territory with pulsating raw eroticism, wicked sado-masochism and bloody, creative gore. The lives of the vampires are upended when a trio of campers come upon the lair and seek to uncover […]

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Command and Control: Is Our Nuclear Luck Running Out?

By Elias Savada. I had nearly forgotten about that nuclear blip a third of a century ago, the one which is the core of Robert Kenner’s new feature Command and Control. It was a missile crisis that nearly wiped out Arkansas and a nice chunk of the United States. So, are you in the mood for […]

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“Just a White Dot, Remember?”: An Interview with Justin S. Lee

By Tom Ue. Justin S. Lee is a Student Academy Award-nominated writer/director with an MFA from the USC School of Cinematic Arts. His storytelling roots began at an early age in childhood, when he grew up in the foreign cityscape of Taipei, Taiwan. Unable to speak its language and truly fit in, he took solace in watching movies, […]

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The Man Who Shot Oliver: An Interview with Cinematographer Ossie Morris

By David A. Ellis. The late notable cinematographer Oswald Norman Morris was born on 22nd November 1915 in Ruislip. Morris started his career as a clapper boy at Wembley Studios in 1932, making quota quickies, which were made in a week to meet the British quota. He was offered an unpaid job and the first […]

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