Home » November 29th, 2016 Entries posted on “November, 2016”

Fan A(Fic)ionados Unite!: Clay Liford on Slash

By Tom Ue. Clay Liford’s new film Slash (2016) centers on high school freshman Neil (Michael Johnston) and his slightly older fellow student Julia (Hannah Marks), both of whom write fanfic online. The process of writing for a public provides the introverted Neil with an outlet but it also pushes him to reevaluate his relationship […]

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Mifune: The Last Samurai – Overshadowing His Tribute

By Christopher Weedman. Released by Strand Releasing and narrated by actor Keanu Reeves, director Steven Okazaki’s new feature-length documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai (2016) is a well-intentioned yet underdeveloped tribute to the larger-than-life actor Toshiro Mifune. As the documentary boldly proclaims, Mifune possessed an unbridled energy and commanding screen presence that enabled him to loom […]

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I Wake Up Screaming: Far from “Kansas”

By Anthony J. Steinbock. The Maltese Falcon is often considered to be the first film noir of the classical noir period (beginning in 1941 and ending in 1958 with Orson Wells, Touch of Evil).[1] Released only two weeks after The Maltese Falcon (Houston, October 18, 1941) is another noir included in the classical catalog, namely, […]

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Beyond the Valley of the Dolls: Vulgarity as Satire

By Christopher Sharrett. The Criterion Collection’s release on Blu-ray of Russ Meyer’s Beyond the Valley of the Dolls might bring accusations of slumming. Such accusations won’t come from me. I have long seen Meyer as one of the great American satirists of low-rent cinema, able to rip the nation and its entertainment to shreds while […]

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The Undersung Heroes of Music: Soundbreaking (A DOC NYC Review)

By Jude Warne. “Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.” –Idiom of recording artist indicating the producer What defines a quality music producer? Well-informed and developed artistic taste? Phenomenal technical prowess in the recording studio? Is it someone who stands off to the side of the musicians, supporting and supplying yet allowing complete artistic […]

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Before and After the Wall – Re-Imagining DEFA: East German Cinema in Its National and Transnational Contexts

A Book Review by Tony Williams. Berghahn is known for its publication of excellent books on German Cinema within its catalog. This recent work proves no exception to the rule. Including fifteen essays by well-known scholars in the field aware of the changing complexities of subject matter and well-versed in necessary archive research, Re-Imagining DEFA (edited […]

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Liverpool Radical Film Festival 2016

By Anthony Killick. The election of Donald Trump is the latest occurrence signalling neoliberalism’s transformation into some form of neo-authoritarianism constituted by a renewed commitment to upholding corporate interests and a frightful endorsement of racism and misogyny. How should those involved in the production, distribution and exhibition of film culture respond? The answer is that […]

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Film Scratches: Digital Lyricism – The Film Poems of Bobie

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Bobie (Yves Bommenel) is a French poet and composer who has created a series of inventive, invigorating videos of some of his poems. They are all […]

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Film Scratches: Disturbing Desires – Light-Sleep (2009)

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Light-sleep, a 6 minute film of hand processed found footage by Hungarian filmmaker Péter Lichter, begins with a shot of a child trying to sleep in […]

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Ida Lupino, Director by Therese Grisham and Julie Grossman

Rutgers University Press presents Ida Lupino, Director: Her Art and Resilience in Times of Transition (May 2017), the first study devoted to a fascinating and largely ignored voice in American cinema. While addressing the context of Lupino’s work, with special attention to censorship, authors Therese Grisham and Julie Grossman focus on the films of the 1950s, including the feminist […]

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