Home » July 24th, 2017 Entries posted on “July, 2017”

Film Scratches: Dark Comedy of Dangerous Rhetoric – Stenography (2016)

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Stenography, Lee Murray’s fabulously complex, sophisticated and enthralling hour-long epic comedy about political turmoil in Munich 1923, begins modestly with a narrator (the eloquent Kristin Kluver) […]

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From Chile to High Concept: Marko Zaror on Savage Dog

By Martin Kudláč. Marko Zaror, Chilean-born martial artist known from the films of Robert Rodriguez, stars as the nemesis, Rastingac, to Scott Adkins’s hero Martin Tilman in Jesse V. Johnson’s latest action film, Savage Dog. Tilman, a former champion boxer, fights for wealthy criminals to bet on while he is imprisoned somewhere in Den-Dhin-Chan Labor Camp in […]

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Film Scratches: Meditations on the Ordinary – The Short Trilogy of Peace (2016)

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Martin Sagadin in a Slovenian filmmaker living in Canterbury, New Zealand. His Short Trilogy of Peace consists of three shorts, which he aptly calls “poetic documentaries.” […]

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L’argent: Bresson Ends

By Christopher Sharrett. The terms “ascetic” and “austere” are too-common adjectives applied to the films of Robert Bresson. It is reasonable to apply them, but for me “constricted,” “severe,” and “repressed” serve better. Many of Bresson’s films, especially in his late phase, are utterly drained of eroticism; critics have debated whether or not Bresson’s Catholic […]

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A Stumble in the Woods: First Kill

By Elias Savada. Bruce Willis still tracks 243 on the IMDB.com STARmeter scale (I’m at 1,325,678). All kind of entertainment folk are part of the ratings, and Willis has been moving downward lately after decades in the top 100. His gradual tumble down the rankings rabbit hole began with the release of A Good Day […]

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Diversity and Unity – Global Cinematic Cities: New Landscapes of Film and Media Edited by Johan Andersson and Lawrence Webb

A Book Review by Margaret C. Flinn. Johan Andersson and Lawrence Webb’s Global Cinema Cities (Columbia UP, 2016) poses as its task to explore “the evolving, mutually constitutive relations between moving image media and the global city, [but to do] so at a time when profound questions are being asked about the ontological and experiential nature […]

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Out of the Dark(room) and Into the Light – The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography

By Elias Savada. There is an elegant, simple beauty in documentarian Errol Morris’s affectionate portrait of his friend, soft-spoken, 80-year-old Elsa Dorfman, in his new film. In a career that spanned the majority of her adult life, Dorfman has found the fun in photography, and it’s probably best to spell it as FUN, because for more […]

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Facts are Not Stupid Things: Lessons from The Reagan Show

By Heather Hendershot. One week after Donald Trump’s inauguration, Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here reached the #9 position in book sales on Amazon. Brave New World held the #15 slot. Sales also spiked for Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. At the same time, according to Penguin USA, sales of 1984 increased by 9,500 percent. The 1984 uptick […]

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Eleven Heroines Does a Feminist Film Make: Reading Srijit Mukherjee’s Rajkahini

By Devapriva Sanyal and Melissa Webb. Srijit Mukherji’s Rajkahini (2015) is the Bengali version of 2017’s much feted Begum Jaan, the film which served as the director’s first foray into Bollywood. The film is centred on India’s Partition and is uniquely seen through the eyes of women: a group of prostitutes in a brothel who are, one […]

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A Most Assured First Feature: One Penny

By Elias Savada. Part I: The Buildup So, how many teenagers have you met who say they want to make movies when they grow up? Fame and fortune is just around the corner, right? Well, I’ve seen too many homegrown filmmaker dreams turn into muddled nightmares on the road to stardom, and a first feature misstep […]

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