Home » October 31st, 2017 Entries posted on “October, 2017”

Blade of the Immortal: Where Jidaigeki and Manga Collide

By Matthew Fullerton. Takashi Miike isn’t one to shy away from pushing the boundaries of existing genres and teasing his audiences while promoting and screening his films. Take his horror masterpiece Audition (1999). Its narrative meanders along with a gentle story of loss, loneliness, and a search for love before plummeting into creepiness and then […]

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The Florida Project: Childhood in Time of War

By Christopher Sharrett. Occasionally, the Hollywood industry produces a film that notes the poverty flowing from the neoliberal order, as a “permanent underclass” becomes no more than journalistic jargon taken for granted with a shrug by those sectors of the public who need to pay attention. I think of Kelly Reichardt’s Wendy and Lucy, and […]

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Film Scratches: Pulling Meaning out of the Shots – Incident Reports (2016)

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Incident Reports, the brilliant feature-length essay film by Mike Hoolboom, has an ingeniously flexible form. It is comprised of short segments, each around a minute long, […]

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Film Scratches: Prelude (2014)

Film Scratches focuses on the world of experimental and avant-garde film, especially as practiced by individual artists. It features a mixture of reviews, interviews, and essays. A Review by David Finkelstein. Prelude is a 7 minute film by Simon Welch about a young girl (Mel Z) practicing a Bach prelude on the piano. She practices using a […]

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Northern Lights: The 14th Reykjavík International Film Festival

By Randy Malamud. I didn’t see the Aurora Borealis during my October visit to the Reykjavík International Film Festival, probably because I spent every night at the movies, but I did have some spectacular views of them on screen. “The energy of the planet comes from the north,” says a surfer in Under an Arctic […]

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Amplified Isolation: It Takes from Within

By Gary M. Kramer. The wordless pre-credit sequence of It Takes from Within sets the tone for this stark, atmospheric drama: three couples crawl, stand, and lie in a bed on an illuminated patch of grass. Gorgeously filmed in luminous black and white, the sequences does not make much sense, but its point may become […]

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The “Complete Italianization” of the Western: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly from Kino Lorber

By Tony Williams. This is the moment when the Italianization of the Western was complete. –Alberto Moravia, quoted by Christopher Frayling As most film departments merge into Media conglomerates and student knowledge of past films diminishes due to increasing time constraints, it is all the more important that the world outside continues promoting past traditions […]

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Mark Felt: History as Mysticism

By Christopher Sharrett. One of the characteristics of our militarized society, aside from the constant deluge of cop shows, superhero movies, and inane affirmations of family life, is the erasure of history. We may think we get the past in reliable form via the PBS channels and other “respected” media outlets, in solemn documentaries like […]

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Balancing Gentleness and Extremity: Avishai Sivan Talks TIkkun

By Martin Kudláč. The 17th edition of the T-Mobile New Horizons International Film Festival in Wroclaw revisits several Israeli film within their retrospective introducing New Israeli Cinema that the festival considers producing “some of the most interesting cinema in the world.” The thematic sidebar also featured Avishai Sivan’s existential, and in a way mysterious, thriller Tikkun […]

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Flight to Salvation: The King’s Choice

By Jake Rutkowski. About twenty minutes into The King’s Choice, it hits me: I know absolutely nothing about Norway’s political history. Nor its governmental structure. Nor its involvement in World War II. Nothing. While there are some informational title cards at the start of the film, I found myself bereft of any sense of dramatic irony, […]

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