Home » January 31st, 2018 Entries posted on “January, 2018”

On National Consciousness – Hungarian Film 1929-1947: National Identity, Anti-Semitism, and Popular Cinema by Gabor Gergely

A Book Review by Robert Buckeye. In Jean-Luc Godard’s Les Carabainares (1963), a soldier at a cinema for the first time sees a woman on the screen, leaves his seat to meet her, and walks into the screen. What he sees he believes to be real, but he does not understand that what we see may […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

White Micro-aggression Against Black Film: Awards and Why They Matter

By André Seewood. Every weekend numerous websites inform us of the short term box office grosses of various films like Star Wars: The Last Jedi which itself has raked in a whopping 591 million dollars in short-term office gross in this country alone. This notion of box office profit as the guiding measurement of a film’s […]

Posted in Features | Read More »

The Post: Nostalgia for Half-Truth

By Christopher Sharrett. I hope that Steven Spielberg’s The Post ignites more interest in the standard media, at a time when blogs and rightist websites, and the repugnant Fox News, are lauded by the Trump Administration and its friends as the only outlets not involved in “fake news.” But that’s about as much as I […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

Seasonal Pageantry from Philadelphia: Christmas Dreams

By Elias Savada. Christmas comes but once a year, but folks who like the holiday’s sweet joy and heartfelt message might take a look at Christmas Dreams anytime they’re down and weary. It’s a surprisingly simple spiritual picker-upper that takes The Little Drummer Boy and The Nutcracker Princess, two public domain characters that Disney can’t sue […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

“America First” or Second? – America Through a British Lens: Cinematic Portrayals 1930-2010 by James D. Stone

A Book Review Essay by Tony Williams. Captain Hornsby: “What an extraordinary fellow!” Colonel Thompson: “Well, he’s an American.”  – Too Late the Hero (Robert Aldrich, 1970) This book, which began life as a doctoral dissertation, represents the best attributes of McFarland Publishers in bringing to publication works that would generally be ignored by prestigious publishers who would often […]

Posted in Features | Read More »

Home Sweet Homicide: Mom & Dad

By Elias Savada. Nicolas Cage, like Bruce Willis, seems to be trying everything and anything to reinvent his career. Or find a wider audience, like the ones that once flocked to the back-to-back-to-back hits (The Rock, Con Air, Face/Off) which followed his Oscar-winning performance in Leaving Las Vegas, a distant 23 years ago. Of late, Willis […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

Dread and Genetics – An Interview with Hèctor Hernández Vicens on Day of the Dead: Bloodline

By Tom Ue. Hèctor Hernández Vicens reimagines George A. Romero’s 1985 zombie classic in his new film Day of the Dead: Bloodline. Starring Johnathon Schaech, Sophie Skelton, and Marcus Vanco, Bloodline follows a med-school student (Skelton) into an apocalyptic, zombie-filled world, where she is haunted by a half-human, half-zombie. Vicens is a novelist, film and TV […]

Posted in Interview | Read More »

New York Stage and Screen Marvel – Anne Bancroft, A Life by Douglass K. Daniel

A Book Review by Louis J. Wasser. “I’m always lonely when I work…You’re going through a very private inner experience that requires personal strength. I accept this loneliness, but it’s one of the big fears of going back to work.” (158) – Anne Bancroft Moviegoers bore witness to a sea change in films in 1967 when they […]

Posted in Review | Read More »

Out of a Bleak Past: An Interview with Lynne Ramsay on You Were Never Really Here

By Ali Moosavi. In 90 years of Academy Awards, only one woman director, Kathryn Bigelow, has been awarded the Best Director Oscar. The recent stories of women harassment in the American film industry has shown that it has indeed been a man’s world in Tinsletown though this is surely changing now. One of those rare […]

Posted in Interview | Read More »

Utopia Achieved: Call Me by Your Name

By Christopher Sharrett. I’ve kept in mind Luca Guadagnino since his 2009 film I Am Love, which made such good use of both Visconti and Renoir while creating a work wholly Guadagnino’s own. I was less impressed with A Bigger Splash (2015), which seemed to me a work poorly thought-through (Tilda Swinton as a stadium-style […]

Posted in Review | Read More »