Home » March 30th, 2018 Entries posted on “March, 2018”

Deceit and Inconsistency: The China Hustle

By Travis Merchant. A decade has passed since the beginning of an economic recession that many still feel today. The recession of 2008 brought about a collapsed American market that desperately searched for a shining light to capitalize on to regain its losses. Consequently, it found China: a topic that Jed Rothstein explores, dissects, and comments […]

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Rebellious Departure: An Interview with Nanouk Leopold on Cobain

By Yun-hua Chen. Premiering at the Berlinale Generation 2018, Cobain is a film about the eponymous hero, a 15-year-old boy in Rotterdam played by the first-time actor Bas Keizer. As his drug addict and expectant mother Mia is unable to take care of him, Cobain is sent to a foster family from the children’s home. […]

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Max Winkler’s Flower Sour

By Elias Savada. I didn’t like Max Winkler’s first feature, the dreary comedy Ceremony (2011), a quirky tic of a wedding crasher film. My impression of his directorial abilities hasn’t changed much in Flower, a jaded Valley Girl vigilante drama that screams “watch my petals wilt” as shell-shocked patrons wander out of art houses trying […]

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Andy Goldsworthy’s Landscape Art: Leaning Into the Wind

By John Duncan Talbird. In the opening of the new documentary, Leaning Into the Wind, artist Andy Goldsworthy tours a small home in the mountains in Brazil. To Western eyes, the dwelling might seem pre-modern, even decrepit. But to Goldsworthy, all he sees is the handcraft of the residence, the sturdy joists in the ceiling, and […]

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Role-Playing Writ Small: I Kill Giants

By Elias Savada. Children dealing with their fears – although not those anxieties normally associated with horror genre tropes like The Dark, Loud Noises, and such – play a central role in I Kill Giants, which melds one Eastern Long Island, New York, family’s enigmatic trauma with monstrous, noxious beasts that inhabit the mind of a […]

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Comedy Killing Satire: The Death of Stalin

By Jake Rutkowski. The process of interpersonal grievances and small-scale ironies rippling out into matters of national security is at this point a calling card for celebrated Scottish satirist Armando Iannucci (he of Alan Partridge, The Thick of It / In the Loop, and Veep fame). It’s fair to say that The Death of Stalin, his […]

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Redemption Post-Aparthied: Roland Joffé on The Forgiven

By Tom Ue. Produced, directed, and co-written by Roland Joffé, The Forgiven is an adaptation of Michael Ashton’s play The Archbishop and the Antichrist. The film stars Academy Award-winner Forest Whitaker as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who, in his work as President of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in post-apartheid South Africa, meets Piet Blomfeld (Eric […]

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Hard Truths: An Interview with Marcio Reolon and Filipe Matzembacher on Tinta Bruta

By Yun-hua Chen. Shot in the southern Brazilian city Porto Alegre and directed by the duo Filipe Matzembacher and Mario Reolon, Tinta Bruta is a gentle portrait about Pedro, a young man who earns his living by performing on gay-oriented streaming platforms, and a city from which young people depart in waves. Uncomfortable in face-to-face social […]

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Family Values and Civic Duties: Fassbinder’s Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day

By Jeremy Carr. Rainer Werner Fassbinder was particularly adept at transitioning between the cinema and television (and theater, for that matter), starting the crossover just a few films in to his prolific directorial career, with Das Kaffeehaus, a TV movie released in 1970. In 1972, already with a mind-boggling 14 titles to his credit – since 1969 – […]

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Unlovely Spectacle: D.A. Miller on Call Me By Your Name

By David Greven. An exchange I had with an older, straight, white academic in Film Studies serves as an instructive example of a particular phenomenon that I will call the Miller Effect. Hearing me express admiration for Ang Lee’s 2005 film Brokeback Mountain, which I consider a masterpiece, he stared at me incredulously before saying, […]

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