Inland Empire (2006)

By Bryan Nixon. David Lynch’s latest dream-like film Inland Empire (2006), a three-hour experimental epic that resembles a house of mirrors, is certainly his most ambitious and abstract. The director of daring masterworks such as Blue Velvet (1986) has pieced together yet another film that cannot be analyzed in terms […]

Les Enfants terribles: An Interview with Françoise Marie

By Tim Palmer and Liza Palmer. The recent work of Françoise Marie explores a child-centered view of the world.  Setting up a series of improvised games, then filming the results with little or no intervention, her films show young children re-enacting, from their perspective, the actions of adults in their […]

La Vie en Richmond | VCU French Film Festival, 28–30 March 2008

By Liza Palmer and Tim Palmer. Travelling through the Carytown area of Richmond, Virginia, the weekend of 28–30 March 2008, one would not suspect that recent relations between the United States and France had been anything but rosy. Lampposts were festooned with French flags. Local bistros and bakeries promised delectable […]

Silence (Chinmoku, 1971)

By Anton Bitel. In Japan, Christianity is a minority religion of only marginal significance to the nation’s culture, and accordingly Japanese films that focus on Christianity tend to do so as a means to an end. While Norifumi Suzuki’s nunsploitation shocker School of the Holy Beast (Seiju gakuen, 1974), for […]

Army of Shadows (1969)

By Tim Palmer. Few directors have enjoyed a contemporary renaissance like Jean-Pierre Melville.  Over the last five years his career has been newly appraised and celebrated ― especially in the English language ― while many of his films have received meticulous restorations, and at last been re-released.  Today, Melville’s reputation […]

Isolationism in Dead Man Walking

By Dustin Griffin, Honorable Mention in the 2006 Frank Capra Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Film Criticism. Dead Man Walking (1995) is about religious faith and the societal issues surrounding the death penalty; the film deconstructs the issue of forgiveness as it is taught in the Old Testament, with its […]

BFI Film Classics: Belle de Jour, Michael Wood, (2000)

Book Review by Daniel Herbert. Michael Wood begins his book on Belle de Jour by characterizing Luis Buñuel’s style as “a form of impatience” (page 8).  One might assume that, at a mere seventy-seven pages, Wood might require a similar impatience to breeze through the intricacies and enigmas that abound […]