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Son of Saul: Versions of the Irrational

By Christopher Sharrett. I have been meaning for some time to put pen to paper about last year’s superb achievement by Laszlo Nemes, Son of Saul, but have hesitated for various reasons, not least of which was that any comment by me on the film would as this point seem wholly superfluous. But after numerous […]

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Michael Morris’ Hermeneutics: Visual Music, Expanded Cinema, New Aesthetic

By Michael Betancourt. Michael Morris’ expanded cinema performances, Second Hermeneutic (2013) lasting approximately nine minutes, and Third Hermeneutic (2014) lasting approximately eleven minutes, are both produced using a combination of traditional 16mm film projectors and video; Third Hermeneutic also employs digital technology – a laptop computer running a custom Midi-controlled piece of software created with the […]

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In Praise of Susan Oliver: The Green Girl (2014)

By Tony Williams. “She was so much more than the Green woman in Star Trek” (George Pappy DVD audio-commentary). “What I knew I didn’t want was to just get married and become a housewife and lose my identity.” (Oliver: 81) Produced and directed by George Pappy, who also co-wrote the script with editor Amy Glickman Brown, […]

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United 93: A Social Conscience and the Ease of Historicism (A 10th Anniversary Retrospective)

By David Ryan. Before United 93 opened ten years ago, the film’s previews were greeted with varying degrees of stress and grief. Although some theaters threatened to pull the previews to allay the pathos of its audience (the wounds still freshly felt in their hearts), only one New York theater reportedly did. When the film […]

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All the Fire: The use of sexual imagery as a way for attracting cinema audiences in 1950s America

By Anthony Uzarowski. The 1950s are often seen as the time of Hollywood’s greatest splendour, yet the reality of the time was plummeting cinema attendance, which by 1953 came to be half of what it had been in 1946. In the face of radical social and economic changes, as well as the birth of television, […]

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Star Wars Episode VII: Feminism from “Far, Far Away”

By Sotiris Petridis. Introduction The Star Wars saga is an internal and important part of popular culture since its first filmic text back in 1977. Apart from the films, there are comics, novels, television series, and a plethora of merchandising products that interact with our everyday life. So, gender representation in this filmic universe matters […]

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Cannibalized Chaos: Iago, The Joker and the “Good Sport” of Postmodernism

By Richmond B. Adams. During a conversation approximately one-third of the way through The Dark Knight (2008), Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) expresses to Alfred Pennyworth (Michael Caine) his view concerning the escalating rampages of The Joker (Heath Ledger) across Gotham City.[1] Wayne states that “Criminals aren’t complicated, Alfred. We just need to figure out what […]

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The Sentinel Excavated

By Christopher Sharrett. I use the word “excavated” in my title not because the 1977 horror film The Sentinel , directed by Michael Winner, is lost to film history, but because it has been buried – with some justification – by legitimate criticism worthy of respect. I will argue in a bit that the film […]

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The Best and the Most Overrated of 2015

By Film International. The editors’ Top 10 and Overrated 10 include films that were released in the editors’ respective regions during 2015. They have been selected by Daniel Lindvall (editor-in-chief, based in Stockholm, Sweden), Jacob Mertens (review and festival editor, based in Madison, WI, USA) and Matthew Sorrento (interview and book review editor, based in […]

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CGI and the Audience: Things Better Left Unsaid

By Fred Wagner. The Show of Shows (2015), a recently released documentary made out of archive footage shows the lost world of the circus – a cornucopia of acts the like of which were once the vanguard of kitsch but that now seem so alien you can look at them like you sometimes would an […]

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